Historic Reference Only: Current Bulletin is at http://www.stonybrook.edu/ugbulletin
2003 - 2005 Undergraduate Bulletin 2003 - 2005 Undergraduate Bulletin
2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin Supplement


Changes and Additions to
Approved Majors, Minor, and Programs

The majors, minors and programs listed below have been added to the curriculum or have had their requirements changed in some way since the publication of the 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin. (Entries are arranged alphabetically by name of program.)

When requirements change, students who have completed at least 45 credits may elect to satisfy either the previous major requirements or the new major requirements. Students with fewer than 45 credits must satisfy the new requirements, unless the major department specifies otherwise. Please consult the section "When Major Requirements Change" in the Academic Policies and Regulations chapter of the Bulletin (pages 75-76 in the printed Bulletin), for complete details.

This list is continually being updated. Twice during the year, at the end of each semester, the entire Bulletin (including this Supplement) is archived. That is, a "snapshot" of the Bulletin is taken and saved for reference. These dated archives serve as official records of the Bulletin as it changes semester by semester.

Adapted Aquatics (HSQ)
Africana Studies (AFS)
Athletic Training (ATC)
Biochemistry and Cell Biology (BIO)
Business Management (BUS)
Biomedical Engineering (BME)
Chemical and Molecular Engineering (CME)
Chemistry (CHE)
China Studies (CNS)
Computer Engineering (ECE)
Computer Science (CSE)
Department of Comparitive Studies
Earth and Space Sciences (ESS)
Economics (ECO)
Education and Teacher Certification
Electrical Engineering (ESE)
Engineering Science (ESG)
English (EGL)
Environmental Studies (ENS)
Federated Learning Community Minor in Globalization (GLS)
Geology (GEO)
German (GER)
Health Science (HAN)
Materials Science (ESM)
Mechanical Engineering (MEC)
Pharmacology (BCP)
Science and Engineering (LSE)
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary (SSI)


Adapted Aquatics

[Effective Summer 2004]
For reference, please see the Minor in Adapted Aquatics or refer to page 94 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

All PEC courses that count toward the Adapted Aquatics minor use the HSQ designator. The course numbers remain the same.

Africana Studies

[Effective Spring 2004]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in Africana Studies or refer to pages 96-97 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Both the Major and Minor requirements for Africana Studies have been rewritten as follows:

Requirements for the Major in Africana Studies (AFS)
The major in Africana studies leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. All courses for the major, except those graded S/U, must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher. Completion of the major requires 45 credits, including 27 upper-division credits (from courses numbered 300 or higher).

  1. Foundation courses
    • AFS 101, 102 Themes in the Black Experience I, II

  2. Two courses from each of the following areas:

    1. Africana Studies in the Humanities
      • AFH 206 Great Books of the Black Experience
      • AFH/EGL 249 African-American Literature and Music in the 19th and 20th Centuries
      • AFH 329/HUF 318 Pan-African Literature I
      • AFH 330 Pan-African Literature II
      • AFH/EGL 368 Caribbean and American Connections in Literature
      • AFH/HUF 385 French Caribbean Literature

    2. Africana Studies in the Social Sciences
      • AFS/HIS 221 Introduction to Modern African History
      • AFS 239 Introduction to the Caribbean Experience
      • AFS 240 Issues in Caribbean Society
      • AFS/HIS 277 The Modern Color Line
      • AFS/SOC 365 Introduction to African Society
      • AFS 372 African American Political Thought
      • AFS/ANT 395 Religions of the Caribbean

    3. The African-American Experience
      • AFS 300 Blacks in the City
      • AFS 310 American Attitudes Toward Race
      • AFS 319 The Politics of Race
      • AFS/HIS 325 The Civil Rights Movement
      • AFS/WST 350 African American Women and Social Change
      • AFS 360 African-American Social Commentary
      • AFS 370 The African-American Family
      • AFS 375 Slavery
      • AFS 463, 464 The Media and Black America I, II

    4. The Global African Experience
      • AFH 379 Philosophy of Race
      • AFS/WST 345 Culture and Gender: Women in Africa and the Caribbean
      • AFS/POL 337 The Politics of Africa
      • AFH 339/ARH 329 Arts of the African Diaspora
      • AFS/HIS 346 Political and Social History of Africa
      • AFS/ANT 380 Race and Ethnicity in Latin America and the Caribbean
      • AFS/WST 381 Race, Gender, Class, and the Epidemiology of AIDS
      • AFS 388 Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean
      • AFS 400 Ancient Egypt (KMT): Historical and Contemporary Views
      • AFS 410 Computers and Third World Social Issues
      • AFS 491 Interdisciplinary Seminar in African Studies

  3. Three credits in AFH or AFS 447 Readings in Africana Studies
    or AFH or AFS 487 Research in Africana Studies taken in the junior or senior year.

  4. Twelve upper-division elective credits chosen from courses offered by the Department of Africana Studies. (See note 1)

  5. Upper-Division Writing Requirement
    Africana studies majors are required to submit two essay or term paper assignments, completed for two upper-division AFS courses, with grades of B or higher. They must also submit an evaluation form for the writing samples, signed by the professor(s) who read the samples, which indicates that the writing proficiency requirement has been met. Students must inform instructors in advance if they plan to use papers from their courses to fulfill the writing requirement for the major. Submitted papers must be a minimum of 15 pages in length.
Notes:
  1. Three courses offered by other departments (including special topics courses) are acceptable for the major with the approval of the undergraduate studies director.
  2. Students must take at least two 200-level courses in Africana Studies prior to beginning their junior year.
  3. Only six credits of directed readings or independent study courses courses numbered 447 and 487) may be used toward the major.
  4. The following courses may not be used to fulfill major requirements: AFS 283, 475, 476, 488; AFH 475, 476.
  5. Transfer students must take at least 12 credits of upper-division Africana Studies courses in residence at Stony Brook to complete the AFS major.


Requirements for the Minor in Africana Studies (AFS)
The minor in Africana studies is intended for students interested in exploring aspects of the Black experience in ways that relate to their own major field of study. The sequence of lower- and upper-division courses gives the student a well-balanced analysis of the varied aspects of the African and African-American experience. All courses offered for the minor, except those graded S/U, must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.

Completion of the minor requires 24 credits, including 12 upper-division credits.
  1. AFS 101, 102 Themes in the Black Experience I, II

  2. One course from each of the following areas (see above):
    • Africana Studies in the Humanities
    • Africana Studies in the Social Sciences
    • The African-American Experience
    • The Global African Experience

  3. One additional upper-division course selected from one of the areas listed in requirement 2.

  4. Three credits in AFH or AFS 447 Readings in Africana Studies
    or AFH or AFS 487 Research in Africana Studies taken in the junior or senior year.

Athletic Training

[Effective Summer 2004]
For reference, please see the Major in Athletic Training or refer to pages 114-116 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

All PEC courses that count toward the Adapted Aquatics minor now use the HAL designator. The course numbers remain the same.

Biochemistry and Cell Biology

[Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Majors and Minors in Biochemistry and Cell Biology or refer to pages 123 and 125 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

The Organic Chemistry sequence has been modified. CHE 321, Organic Chemistry I, remains the same, while Organic Chemistry II has been split into two levels: CHE 322, Organic Chemsitry IIA, and CHE 326, Organic Chemistry IIB. CHE 326 is designed especially for those who may major in chemistry, biochemistry, or another physical science, and may not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 322. In addition, CHE 331, 332, Honors Organic Chemistry, have been discontinued.

Please make the following changes:

In Requirements for the Major in Biochemistry
A. Courses in related fields
3. The Organic Chemistry sequence has been revised as follows:
CHE 321, 326 Organic Chemistry I, IIB

In Requirements for the Major in Biology
A. Courses required in related fields
3. The Organic Chemistry sequence has been revised as follows:
CHE 321, 326 Organic Chemistry I, IIB


Biomedical Engineering

[Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major in Biomedical Engineering or refer to page 131 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Under Requirements for the Major
2. Natural Sciences, add BIO 202 Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology so that the second line reads
"BIO 202 Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology or BIO 203 Fundamentals of Biology: Cellular and Organ Physiology".

Business Management

1. [Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in Business Management or refer to page 136 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

    There is now an honors program in Business Management. The following section has been inserted before "The Minor in Business Management":

    The Honors Program in Business Management
    The honors program in business management is research oriented. For admission to the program, students must be BUS majors with junior standing and a cumulative G.P.A. of at least 3.3 through the spring semester of their sophomore year. Four BUS courses, BUS 110, 210, 249, and 340, must have been completed with a G.P.A. of at least 3.3. Qualified students must submit an essay describing innovative ideas for business research and a letter of recommendation from a faculty member. They will be interviewed to assess motivation to pursue the honors program curriculum which includes six honors courses that replace regular BUS courses and a two-semester honors research project and paper. Students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative G.P.A. to remain in the program but conferral of honors is contingent upon completion of all required courses with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher, both overall and in business management courses.

2. [Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in Business Management or refer to page 135 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Under Requirements for the Major
E. Electives, please change the wording so that rather than saying "Four courses chosen from the following:" it says instead
"A minimum of four electives, chosen from the following, must be completed in addition to the courses required for the major."

Chemical and Molecular Engineering
Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering,
College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

[Effective Spring 2004: new major]

CHAIRPERSON: Michael Dudley
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM DIRECTORS: Miriam Rafailovich and Devinder Mahajan
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: Gertha Benoit-Hollis
OFFICE: Engineering 314
PHONE: (631) 632-8484
EMAIL: devinder.mahajan@stonybrook.edu or mrafailovich@ms.cc.sunysb.edu
WEB ADDRESS: coming soon

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers two majors leading to the Bachelor of Engineering (B.E.) degree, Engineering Science (see entry in the alphabetical listings of Approved Majors, Minors and Programs) and Chemical and Molecular Engineering. The program in Chemical and Molecular Engineering is designed to meet the expanding demand for chemical engineers in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries for food, health products, and cosmetics in the New York region. It emphasizes engineering at the molecular level rather than traditional large-scale process engineering. In a rigorous cross-disciplinary environment, the program provides students with knowledge in the basic physical sciences, mathematical techniques, and computational modeling tools that form the foundation of modern chemical and molecular engineering. A broad spectrum of courses prepares students to assimilate and apply their knowledge creatively to solve complex problems involving not only scientific but also ethical and moral considerations, and utilizing effective communication skills for working in an interdisciplinary team. Employment opportunities for graduates of the program include high-technology industries and institutions that are engaged in research and advanced manufacturing related to nanotechnology, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, future fuels, waste management, and the synthesis of new materials.

Courses Offered in Chemical and Molecular Engineering
See the Course Descriptions listing in this Bulletin for complete information.(Descriptions will be posted soon.)

CME 101 Introduction to Chemical and Molecular Engineering
CME 300 Writing in Chemical and Molecular Engineering
CME 302 Material and Energy Balance
CME 303 Reaction Engineering and Chemical Kinetics
CME 304 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I
CME 307 Molecular Modeling
CME 308 Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics
CME 310 Chemical Engineering Laboratory I: Unit Operation and Fundamentals
CME 314 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II
CME 315 Numerical Methods for Chemical Engineering Analysis
CME 320 Chemical Engineering Laboratory II: Chemical and Molecular Engineering
CME 392 Chemical Engineering Heat and Mass Transfer
CME 401 Separation Technologies I
CME 402 Separation Technologies II
CME 410 Chemical Engineering Laboratory III: Instrumentation, Material Design, and Characterization
CME 420 Chemical Engineering Laboratory IV: Directed Research
CME 440 Process Engineering and Design I
CME 441 Process Engineering and Design II


Acceptance into the Major in Chemical and Molecular Engineering
Freshman and transfer applicants who have specified their interest in the major in chemical and molecular engineering may be accepted directly into the major upon admission to the University. Applicants admitted to the University but not immediately accepted into the chemical and molecular engineering major may apply for acceptance at any time during the academic year by contacting the director of the undergraduate program. Priority for admission is given to those students who have:

  1. completed AMS 151, PHY 131/133 and CHE 131/133 (or their equivalents),
  2. earned a G.P.A. of 3.0 in these mathematics, physics, and chemistry courses with not more than one grade of C or lower, and
  3. received completed course evaluations for all transferred courses that are to be used to meet requirements of the major.

Requirements for the Major in Chemical and Molecular Engineering (CME)
The curriculum begins with a focus on mathematics, physics, and chemistry followed by courses covering specific chemical engineering topics as well as an intensive laboratory sequence. In addition, each student chooses a four-course sequence as an area of specialization and completes the curriculum with a year-long capstone course in process engineering and design that integrates the knowledge acquired in the sciences, engineering, and communication. Completion of the major requires approximately 112 credits.

  1. Mathematics
    • AMS 151, 161 Applied Calculus I, II
    • AMS 261 or MAT 203 or MAT 205 Calculus III
    • AMS 361 or MAT 303 or MAT 305 Calculus IV

      Note: The following alternate calculus course sequences may be substituted for AMS 151, 161:
      • MAT 131, MAT 132
      • MAT 125, 126, 127
      • MAT 141, 142

  2. Natural Sciences
    • CHE 131, 132 General Chemistry I, II
    • CHE 133, 134 General Chemistry Laboratory I, II
    • CHE 321, 322 Organic Chemistry I, II
    • CHE 383, 384 Introductory and Intermediate Synthetic and Spectroscopic Laboratory Techniques
    • PHY 131, 132 Classical Physics I, II
    • PHY 133, 134 Classical Physics Laboratory I, II
    • PHY 251 Modern Physics and PHY 252 Modern Physics Laboratory,
      or ESG 281 Introduction to the Solid State

      Note: The following alternate physics course sequences may be substituted for PHY 131/133, 132/134:
      • PHY 125, 126, 127
      • PHY 141, 142

  3. Computer Programming
    one of the following:
      • ESG 111 Programming for Engineers
      • MEC 112 Practical C/C++ for Scientists and Engineers
      • MEC 111 Computer Science for Engineering
      • ESE 124 Computer Techniques for Electronic Design

  4. Engineering
    • ESG 332 Materials Science I: Structure and Property of Materials

  5. Chemical Engineering
    • CME 101 Introduction to Chemical and Molecular Engineering
    • CME 304, 314 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I and II
    • CME 302 Material and Energy Balance
    • CME 303 Reaction Engineering and Chemical Kinetics
    • CME 308 Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics
    • CME 315 Numerical Methods for Chemical Analysis
      or CME 307 Molecular Modeling
    • CME 392 Chemical Engineering Heat and Mass Transfer
    • CME 401, 402 Separation Technologies I and II
    • CME 310, 320, 410, 420 Chemical Engineering Laboratory I, II, III, IV
    • CME 440, 441 Process Engineering and Design I and II

  6. Specializations in Chemical Engineering and Molecular Engineering
    Chemical and Molecular Engineering students must choose from one of the six specializations offered. Each specialization requires the completion of four technical elective courses.

  7. Upper-Division Writing Requirement
    All degree candidates must demonstrate skill in written English at a level acceptable for engineering majors. All chemical and molecular engineering students must complete the writing course CME 300 concurrently with CME 310. The quality of writing in technical reports submitted for CME 310 is evaluated, and students whose writing does not meet the required standard are referred for remedial help. Satisfactory writing warrants an S grade for CME 300, thereby satisfying the requirement.

    Grading
    All courses taken to satisfy requirements 1-6 above must be taken for a letter grade of C or higher.

    Specializations
    Students must complete four courses in a chosen specialization. (In some cases, there is also a pre- or corequisite course attached to one of the courses.) In consultation with a faculty advisor, students select their area of specialization before registering for the first semester of the junior year and not later than upon earning 57 credits. Students are urged to meet regularly with their advisors regarding completion of the course requirements for the chosen specialization. Other courses may be used towards this requirement with the prior permission of the undergraduate program director.

    1. Pharmacology
      Ensures a sound background in pharmacology coupled with a foundation in chemical process control, distillation, and molecular modeling for students interested in pursing a career in the food, cosmetics, or pharmaceutical industries or in medical instrumentation.

      • BIO 361, 362 Biochemistry I, II
      • BCP 401 Principles of Pharmacology
      • BCP 402 Advanced Pharmacology

    2. Materials Science
      Provides a foundation in properties of materials, engineering mechanics, and electronic materials for students interested in computer-related industries, nanotechnology and electronics.
      • ESG 333 Materials Science II: Electronic Properties
      • ESM 334 Materials Engineering
      • ESM 335 Mechanical Properties of Materials
      • ESM 336 Electronic Materials

    3. Polymer Science
      Provides a foundation in the properties of polymers, spectroscopy of organic compounds, polymer synthesis, and polymer processing for students interested in pursuing research in major laboratories or in academia.
      • ESM 369 Polymers
      • CHE 344 Spectroscopy of Organic Compounds
      • ESM 370 Polymer Synthesis
      • ESM 371 Polymer Processing

    4. Business Management and Technology Transfer
      Provides a foundation in financial accounting and management science for students who plan to pursue a career in the business administration in the high-technology industry or in patent law.
      • BUS 210 Financial Accounting
      • EST 392 Engineering and Managerial Economics
      • EST 393 Production and Operations Analysis
      • EST 421 Starting the High-Technology Venture

    5. Environmental Sensing and Compliance
      Provides a background in environmental studies enabling student to apply their knowledge of molecular chemistry to air pollution and control, environmental remediation, waste disposal, and compliance with OSHA safety standards in industry.
      • ATM 397 Air Pollution and its Control
      • MAR 308 Principles of Instrumental Analysis
      • MAR 334 Remote Sensing of the Environment
      • MAR 391 Environmental Policy

    6. Nuclear and Chemical Hazard Detection and Prevention
      Prepares students to address societal issues related to nuclear, chemical, and biological hazard detection, chemical and radioactive waste disposal, and compliance with OSHA standards for safety and security.
      • BIO 202 Fundamentals of Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology
      • MAR/BCP 394 Environmental Toxicology and Public Health
      • CHE 361, 362 Nuclear Chemistry and Laboratory
      • EST/POL 411 Science, Technology, and Arms Control
        or EST 412 Intelligence Organizations, Technology, and Democracy


Sample Course Sequence for the
Chemical and Molecular Engineering Major

Freshman Year
FallcreditsSpringcredits
CME 101
3
AMS 161
3
AMS 151
3
CHE 132, 134
5
CHE 131, 133
5
PHY 131, 133
4
ESG 111
3
WRT 102 or DEC
3
WRT 101 or 102
3
Total
15
Total
15

Sophomore Year
FallcreditsSpringcredits
AMS 261
4
AMS 361
4
CHE 321
3
CHE 322
3
CHE 383
2
CHE 384
3
PHY 132, 134
4
CHE 301
4
ESG 332
4
CME 304
3
Total
17
Total
17

Junior Year
FallcreditsSpringcredits
CME 302
3
CME 303
3
CME 310, 300
2, 0
CME 320
2
CME 308
3
CME 392
3
CME 314
3
DEC
3
CME 315 or DEC*
3
CME 307 or DEC*
3
Specialization course 1
3
Specialization course 2
3
Total
17
Total
17
* Students take either CME 315 or CME 307, but not both.

Senior Year
FallcreditsSpringcredits
CME 401
3
CME 402
3
CME 410
3
CME 420
3
CME 440
3
CME 441
3
Specialization course 3
3
Specialization course 4
3
DEC
3
DEC
3
DEC
3
DEC
3
Total
15-18
Total
18

Chemistry (CHE)

[Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major in Chemistry or refer to page 143 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

The Organic Chemistry sequence has been modified. CHE 321, Organic Chemistry I, remains the same, while Organic Chemistry II has been split into two levels: CHE 322, Organic Chemsitry IIA, and CHE 326, Organic Chemistry IIB. CHE 326 is designed especially for those who may major in chemistry, biochemistry, or another physical science, and may not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 322. In addition, CHE 331, 332, Honors Organic Chemistry, have been discontinued.

Please revise as follows in the degree requirements for both the B.S. and the B.A. in Chemistry.

Requirements for the Major in Chemistry(CHE) (Bachelor of Science Degree)

    A. Core Requirements
      5. The Organic Chemistry sequence has been revised as follows:
      CHE 321, 326 Organic Chemistry I, IIB
Requirements for the Major in Chemistry(CHE) (Bachelor of Arts Degree)
    A. Study within the area of Chemistry
      5. The Organic Chemistry sequence has been revised as follows:
      CHE 321, 326 Organic Chemistry I, IIB

      China Studies (CNS)

[Effective Fall 2003]
For reference, please see the Minor in China Studies or refer to page 143 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

China studies is now part of the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies.

The China Studies program enables students majoring in other fields to pursue China-related courses relevant to their own interests, while developing knowledge and skills that will advance their educational and career goals. Drawing on the perspectives of complementary disciplines, the program offers an 18-credit minor in China Studies that covers both contemporary and historical issues. Students may also earn academic credit through study abroad opportunities.

Proficiency in Chinese language is not required for the minor, although language study is highly encouraged and elective requirements for the minor may be completed through advanced language training. Mandarin Chinese is offered at all levels of instruction, with specialized tracks for "heritage-language" learners and "foreign-language" learners. Enrollment in language courses requires a placement assessment to determine the appropriate level of instruction.

Students with a minor in China Studies are encouraged to concentrate in one of several thematic tracks: language and thought; literature and culture; history and society. Sample course sequences for suggested tracks are available from the program director. Specific distribution of elective credits is planned in consultation with the director.

Requirements for the Minor in China Studies (CNS)
Completion of the minor requires 18 credits. At least 12 credits must be taken in courses numbered 300 or higher. No more than 3 credits may be taken under the Pass/No Credit option; all other courses must be completed with a letter grade of C or higher.
  1. One of the following:
    AAS 220 China: Language and Culture
    AAS/HIS 219 Survey of Modern China
  2. Elective Courses
    Twelve credits chosen from the list of elective courses below. At least nine credits must be in courses numbered 300 or higher.
  3. AAS 487 Independent Research

    Elective Courses
    CHI 111 Elementary Chinese I
    CHI 112 Elementary Chinese II
    CHI 210 Elementary Chinese for Chinese-Speakers
    CHI 211 Intermediate Chinese I
    CHI 212 Intermediate Chinese II
    CHI 311 Readings in Journalistic Chinese
    CHI 312 Readings in Classical Chinese
    CHI 321 Chinese Poetry and Short Stories
    CHI 322 Chinese Lyric Prose and Plays
    AAS 220 China: Language and Culture
    AAS/HIS 351 Revolutionary China: Politics, Culture, and Power
    AAS/HIS 352 Environmental History of China
    AAS/ANT 371 Ancient China
    AAS/ANT 372 Family, Marriage, and Kinship in China
    AAS/ANT 379 Ethnicity and Nation in China
    ARH 203 History of Asian Art
    ARH 318 History of Chinese Painting
    CLT 220 Topics in Chinese Literature
    CLT 361 Literature and Society (when topic is appropriate)
    AAS/HIS 219 Introduction to Chinese History and Civilization (if not used to satisfy requirement 1)
    AAS/HIS 340 Topics in Asian History (when topic is appropriate)
    AAS/HIS 341 20th Century China
    AAS/HIS/WST 345 Women and Gender in Chinese History
    HIS 431 Colloquium in Asian History (when topic is appropriate)
    HIS 432 Colloquium in Asian History (when topic is appropriate)
    PHI 342 History of Chinese Philosophy
    PHI 378 Philosophical Topics in Asian-American History (when topic is appropriate)
    POL 413 Asian Security and Technology Issues
    RLS 102 Eastern Religions
    RLS 240 Confucianism and Taoism
    RLS 260 Buddhism
    RLS 280 Islam
    RLS 390 Special Topics (when topic is appropriate)
    RLS 391 Special Topics (when topic is appropriate)
    THR 313 Asian Theatre and Drama

    Department of Comparative Studies

[Effective Fall 2004]
The Department of Comparative Studies has been renamed as follows: The Department of Comparative and Cultural Studies. The three majors housed in this department are Cinema and Cultural Studies (p. 144), Comparative Literature (p. 149), and Humanities (p. 207).


Computer Engineering (ECE)

1. [Effective Fall 2003]
For reference, please see the Major in Computer Engineering or refer to page 153 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Requirements for the Major in Computer Engineering (ECE)

    7. Engineering Technical Electives
      ESE 337 Digital Signal Processing Theory has been added to the list of technical elective courses.
2. [Effective Fall 2003]
For reference, please see the Major in Computer Engineering or refer to page 153 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Requirements for the Major in Computer Engineering (ECE)
    4. Engineering Topics
      a. Engineering Sciences
        Delete the entire section at the end: "One of the following: MEC 259, ESG 302, ESG 332, ESG 333"
      a. Engineering Design
        Delete the second course listed: ESE 324.
3. [Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major in Computer Engineering or refer to page 153 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Requirements for the Major in Computer Engineering (ECE)
    6. Computer Science
      CSE 113 Foundations of Computer Science I is no longer required. It has been replaced by CSE 230 Intermediate Programming in C and C++.

Computer Science (CSE)

1. [Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in Computer Science or refer to page 157 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Within the Computer Science program description, change the title "Concentration in Computer-Human Interaction" to Specialization in Computer-Human Interaction.

2. [Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in Computer Science or refer to page 157 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Following the Specialization in Computer-Human Interaction, add the following new specialization:

    Specialization in Information Assurance
    The specialization in information assurance (IA) has been developed as part of the University’s establishment of a Center for Cybersecurity and designation by the National Security Agency as a Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education. This is included in a multi-faceted effort to expand and increase information assurance education and research. The specialization deals with the principles, design, development, and management of networks and software systems that provide high levels of assurance in the confidentiality, availability, and integrity of electronic information. It requires four core courses, two electives, and a project. Students may declare their participation in the specialization after completing the courses in 1a and 1b. All courses in 1-3 must be completed with a grade of C or higher.
    1. Core Courses:
      1. CSE 310 Data Communication and Networks
        or CSE 346 Computer Communications
      2. CSE 306 Operating Systems
        or CSE 376 Advanced Systems Programming in UNIX/C
      3. CSE 408 Network Security
      4. Computer System Security
    2. Electives (two from the following list):
      • CSE 305 Principles of Database Systems
      • CSE 306 Operating Systems
      • CSE 315 Database Transaction Processing Systems
      • CSE 336 Internet Programming
      • CSE 375 Concurrency
      • CSE 376 Advanced System Programming in UNIX/C
      • AMS 310 Survey of Probability and Statistics
      • AMS 311 Probability Theory
      • AMS 312 Mathematical Statistics
      • AMS 315 Data Analysis
      • AMS 335 Game Theory
      • AMS 341 Operations Research I: Deterministic Models
      • AMS 342 Operations Research II: Stochastic Models
      • EST 412 Intelligence Organizations, Technology, and Democracy
    3. Project:
      Completion of either CSE 487 Research in Computer Science
      or CSE 495-496 Senior Honors Research Project I-II, on a topic in information assurance.


Earth and Space Sciences

[Effective Spring 2004]
For reference, please see the Interdisciplinary Major in Earth and Space Sciences or refer to pages 160-61 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

The Interdisciplinary Major in Earth and Space Sciences now has two distinct tracks: the Earth and Space Sciences track and the Earth Science Education track.

Requirements for the Earth and Space Sciences track:
Same as "Requirements for the Major in Earth and Space Sciences" in the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Requirements for the Earth Science Education Track
Please see new requirements below:

  1. Introductory science courses
    • GEO 102 The Earth
      and GEO 112 Physical Geology
    • GEO 103 The Earth Through Time
      and GEO 113 Historical Geology Laboratory
    • AST 101 Introduction to Astronomy
      and AST 112 Astronomy Laboratory
    • ATM 205 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences
    • BIO 150 The Living World
    • BIO 201 Fundamentals of Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems
    • CHE 131, 132. General Chemistry I and II (see note below)
    • CHE 133, 134 General Chemistry Laboratory I and II
    • AMS 102 Elements of Statistics
    • MAT 125 Calculus A
    • PHY 119 Physics for Environmental Studies
      or PHY 125 Classical Physics A
    • MAR 104 Oceanography

  2. Elective Courses
    At least 24 credits from approved course list, chosen in consultation with the program director. At least two of the courses must include a laboratory.

  3. Specific Science Concentration
    At least 12 credits of the 24 elective credits must be chosen from one of the earth and space science disciplines: astronomy, atmospheric sciences or geosciences.

  4. Upper-division writing requirement
    All students in the earth science education track must submit two papers (term papers, laboratory reports, or independent research reports) that involve collecting data or observations, processing and interpreting this information and preparing a professional quality report. These reports must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies for evaluation by the end of the junior year. If this evaluation is satisfactory, the student will have fulfilled the upper-division writing requirement. If it is not, the student must fulfill the requirement before graduation.
Note: The sequence CHE 123 and 124 may be substituted for CHE 131 and 132, with permission of the undergraduate program director.


Economics
[Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major in Economics or refer to pages 162-164 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Under "Requirements for the Major in Economics", the second paragraph will read:
Completion of the major requires 39 credits.

Heading A will read:
A minimum of 11 courses, at least nine of them in economics.

Under "Courses Offered in Economics":
1. ECO 318, 340, and 341 have been discontinued.

2. The title of ECO 337 has been changed from "Advanced Labor Theory" to "Labor Theory".


Programs in Education and Teacher Certification

[Effective Spring 2004]
For reference, please see the Programs in Education and Teacher Certification or refer to pages 165-169 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

1. "University-Wide Coordination of Programs" has been expanded to include the first paragraph of "Special Assets of Teacher Preparation at Stony Brook", which no longer exists as a sub-heading. It now reads as follows:

    University-Wide Coordination of Programs
    The various programs, each of which is registered and approved by the New York State Education Department, are coordinated by the Professional Education Program (PEP). PEP performs a major role in the Long Island region by coordinating, supporting, strengthening, and developing: 1. undergraduate and graduate (pre-service) and graduate (in-service) teacher certification and teacher education; 2. educational research and development; and 3. school-university partnership programs. PEP has had a significant positive impact upon the Long Island region and is widely recognized as a symbol of Stony Brook University's commitment to teacher education.

    The university-wide approach to teacher education adopted by Stony Brook provides graduates of our teacher education programs with the intellectual rigor of an academic major as well as a valuable professional credential that qualifies them to teach in New York State and many other states in the country.
2. "University-Wide Coordination of Programs" is now followed by a new section titled "General Information", which includes the balance of the information contained in the former "Special Assets of Teacher Preparation at Stony Brook". "General Information" reads as follows, with changes to the original text in red:
    General Information
    Clinical placements for Stony Brook students are available in a cross-section of partnering school districts that draw upon populations with a wide range of socio-economic and cultural backgrounds, and students with diverse needs. Many of these schools are engaged in innovative and experimental programs in education.

    The Office of Teacher Certification at Stony Brook advises prospective teacher certification candidates in Stony Brook programs on procedures for obtaining New York State teacher certification. Clearance and applications for the certificate are processed by the Office of Teacher Certification, which keeps all documentation pertaining to these services on file and makes it available to students for in-state and out-of-state certification purposes, and to prospective employers.

    Certification is not automatic. Upon successful completion of the University's program, the student must apply for state certification by doing the following:

    • completing the necessary application forms available from the Office of Teacher Certification
    • completing the certificate requirements for Identification and Reporting of Child Abuse and Maltreatment, Substance Abuse Recognition and Referral, and School Violence Prevention and Intervention
    • passing the New York State Teacher Certification Examinations (NYSTCE)
    The Career Placement Center helps students in three ways. Through its credentials service, recommendations supporting students in their application for jobs are kept on file. Copies of these recommendations are sent to prospective employers upon request. The center also posts announcements for teaching jobs available locally and in schools around the country. Students seeking employment in school districts off Long Island are invited to participate in the Long Island Teachers Recruitment Consortium. For more information, contact the Career Placement Center at 682-6810 (Voice/TDD).
3. Some requirements in the "Requirements of the Teacher Education Programs" section have changed. Affected sections are listed below, with changes in red.
    Principal Requirements of the Teacher Education Programs
    2. Students must complete all requirements of the academic major, with a minimum of 36 credits in the content field required for teacher certification. Stony Brook standards exceed NYSED standards in most instances. Be sure to check specific requirements relative to the content area in which you wish to be certified with the appropriate Program Director.

    5. All teacher candidates must have one year of a language other than English at the college level on a transcript of record. This requirement may be met thru the study of American Sign Language as well as foreign languages.

    6. Students should maintain a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.75 in order to remain in good standing. A student who earns less than a B- in either of two methodology courses and/or the student teaching seminar must repeat the course and earn a satisfactory grade before being permitted to advance to the next course in the professional education sequence. A student who earns below a C in either the foundations or literacy courses must earn a satisfactory grade in these courses prior to being accepted for student teaching placement. Professional education courses may only be repeated once. Students should complete all courses required for the major, cognate fields, and professional licensure before they will be allowed to student teach.

      Note: In some instances, departmental requirements may vary from the standards outlined above. It is incumbent upon the student to contact the Teacher Education Program Director within their department or division for updates to these requirements. Requirements for degree and certification are subject to change; it is the responsibility of the individual student to consult the PEP Guide to Teacher Education for current regulations and further information.

    7. Effective February 2004, all candidates for Initial License must have passed the LAST, ATS-W, and CST to qualify for state certification. There are five test dates per annum and no more than two tests can be taken on any given test date. The suggested dates for exam completion are as follows:

      LAST: At the point just prior to completion of the first Methodology course
      CST: At the point just prior to completion of the second Methodology course
      ATS-W: During the semester of Student Teaching

    The Liberal Arts & Sciences Test (LAST) is an assessment of general knowledge, concerned with basic verbal and mathematical reasoning. The Content Specialty Test (CST) is an assessment of knowledge in the cognate field and is predicated around the guidelines in a specific content area, grades 7-12. The Assessment of Teaching Skills - Written (ATS-W) is an assessment of knowledge of pedagogy and teaching methodology as it relates to a specific cognitive area. All three tests must be passed prior to an initial license being issued.

    Prior to filing for certification, all teacher candidates must have their fingerprints cleared by the Division of Criminal Justice Services. In addition, all teacher candidates must have successfully completed two-hour seminar/workshops in Identification and Reporting of Child Abuse and Maltreatment, Substance Abuse Recognition and Referral, and School Violence Prevention and Intervention. Certificates of Completion for these workshops must accompany the application for license along with transcripts from all institutions attended that contain coursework relevant to the specific license. This coursework must contain content, pedagogy, field experience including student teaching, and a minimum of one year of language other than English at the college level. The language requirement may vary by major and in some instances may require completion of two years of language.

    8. Additional requirements set by the academic department in charge of the certification area.

      Note: Courses taken for Pass/No Credit may not be used to satisfy the preparation in professional education component of any Teacher Preparation Program.
4. The note at the end of the "English Secondary Teacher Education Program" should read (revised text in red):
    Note: To be eligible for EGL 441, students must have declared an English major and the teacher education program, and have taken at least one 300-level English course. The Program has established a number of specific requirements that may be satisfied through the courses taken to fulfill the requirements for the major. Consult with the Program Director for detailed information.
5. There are several revisions to the "Science Secondary Teacher Education Program":
    a. The introductory paragraph should read as follows (new text in red):
      The Science Education Program offers undergraduate science education courses satisfying New York State requirements for initial certification as a secondary school teacher of biology, chemistry, earth science, and physics. Consult the Science Education Program concerning professional development courses. While Professor Padwa will advise regarding professional education requirements toward certification, students should approach departmental Teacher Preparation Program Directors for advisement concerning content requirements only relative to obtaining a license within a given cognate field.
    b. Sentences indicating the Content Directors for each program have been added to each program listing:
      Biology Teacher Education Program: The content Director for undergraduate Biology majors is Dr. William Collins.
      Chemistry Teacher Education Program: The content Director for the undergraduate Chemistry program is Dr. Robert Kerber.
      Earth Sciences Teacher Education Program: The content Director for the undergraduate Earth Science program is Dr. Gilbert Hanson.
      Physics Teacher Education Program: The content Director for the undergraduate Physics program is Dr. Robert McCarthy.
6. The "Social Studies Secondary Teacher Eduaction Program" has had two revisions to its Requirements:
    A. Preparation in Social Sciences
      2. A minimum of 48 credits in the social sciences, including courses in the departments mentioned above but excluding psychology, linguistics and multidisciplinary studies. Students should note that not all courses offered through interdisciplinary programs (Africana Studies and Women’s Studies, in particular) are considered social science courses for the purpose of state certification and take this into account in selecting courses.

      3. The Program has established a number of specific requirements that may be satisfied through the 48 social science credits required by the program. Consult with the Program Director for detailed information.

      Notes:
        1. To enroll in SSE 397/449, students must have declared a major in an appropriate social science department, and been accepted into the teacher education program.
7. All changes to the Pathways to Certification chart below are in red.

Pathways to Certification
Students must apply for admission and be formally accepted into each program.

Initial Licensure
English
European
Languages
Mathematics
Sciences
Social Sciences
TESOL
Introduction to Human Development
SSE 327
SSE 327
SSE 327
SSE 327
SSE 327
SSE 327
Foundations of Education
SSE 350
SSE 350
SSE 350
SSE 350
SSE 350
SSE 350
Methods Courses
EGL 440
EGL 441
FLA 339
FLA 340
MAE 301/311
MAE 302/447
SCI 410
SCI 420
SSE 397
SSE 398
LIN 375
LIN 378
Clinical Experience (link to new field experience)
EGL 449
EGL 450
FLA 449
FLA 450
MAE 312
SCI 449
SCI 450
SSE 449
SSE 450
LIN 449++
LIN 450++
Literacy Course
(for new certifications)
LIN 344
LIN 344
LIN 344
LIN 344
LIN 344
LIN 344
Student Teaching
EGL 451
EGL 452
FLA 451
FLA 452
MAE 451
MAE 452
SCI 451
SCI 452
SSE 451
SSE 452
LIN 451
LIN 452
Student Teaching Seminar
EGL 454
FLA 454
MAE 454
SCI 454
SSE 454
LIN 454
36 credits in Content
English
FRN, GER, ITL, RUS, SPN
Mathematics and Applied Mathematics and Statistics
BIO, CHE, ESS, PHY
AFS, ANP, ECO,
HIS, POL, SOC, SSI
(48 credits required for Social Studies)
Linguistics
One year of Language
*
*
*
*
*
Two years of language
**
Child and Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Seminars
#
#
#
#
#
#
NYSTCE--LAST,
ATS-W, CST
##
##
##
##
##
English Proficiency (ELPA)
    ++ Fieldwork is a co-requisite of each methods course.
    * One year of a language other than English is required of all teachers in the State of New York, and may include American Sign Language (ASL).
    ** Two years of a language other than English is required for TESOL and may include ASL.
    # All teachers are required to submit evidence of completion of Child and Substance Abuse, and Violence Prevention Seminars. Fingerprint certification is also required.
    ## All teachers must submit evidence of completion of the LAST, ATS-W, and CST.

Professional Licensure
  • 3 years of teaching at Level (first year--mentored)
  • Functionally relevant Master's Degree
  • NYSTCE; ATS-P

License Maintenance
  • 175 hours of in-service coursework within 5 years
Notes:
All teachers in New York State must be U.S. citizens or non-U.S. citizens who are lawful permanent residents, otherwise they will not be licensed. Proposals for new certification packages in MATs in Mathematics and Spanish are awaiting NYSED approval. New NYSED requirements effective February 2004.


Electrical Engineering (ESE)

[Effective Fall 2003]
For reference, please see the Major in Electrical Engineering or refer to page 173 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

In the Sample Course Sequence for the Microelectronics Track, Senior Year
ESE 304 # should be taken in the Spring rather than the Fall. In the Fall, it should be replaced with an ESE elective.


Engineering Science (ESG)

[Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major in Engineering Science or refer to pages 180-81 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Two new specializations, Civil and Environmental Engineering and Nanoscale Engineering, have been added. Their requirements are as follows:

Civil and Environmental Engineering
Civil and environmental engineering entails study, research, and design of infrastructure or processes responding to societal needs for sustainable development. To complete this specialization, the student completes one of two tracks. Each provides preparation for further study or employment in structural materials engineering, environmental remediation, or engineering involving design for environment (DFE).

    Civil Engineering Track:
    1. Two required courses:
      1. ESM 334 Materials Engineering
      2. GEO/MAR 318 Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes
        or GEO 309 Structural Geology
        or MEC 364 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics
    2. Three technical electives chosen from:
      • GEO 315 Groundwater Hydrology
      • MEC 305 Heat and Mass Transfer
      • MEC 363 Mechanics of Solids
      • MEC 406 Energy Management in Commercial Buildings
      • MEC 455 Advanced Stress Analysis
      • A third course from 1. above
      • ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 cr.)
        or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 cr.)
        or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director
      • ESG 440, 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV
        (with permission of instructor and program director)

    Environmental Engineering Track:
    1. Two required courses:
      1. ESM 334 Materials Engineering
      2. CHE 312 Physical Chemistry
    2. Three technical electives chosen from:
      • ESG 320 Sensor Materials and Devices
      • AMS 322 Groundwater Modeling
      • GEO 316 Geochemistry of Surficial Processes
      • GEO/MAR 318 Engineering Geology and Coastal Processes
      • MAR 301 Environmental Microbiology
      • MAR 336 Marine Pollution
      • MAR 391 Environmental Policy
      • ATM 397 Air Pollution and its Control
      • CHE 361 Nuclear Chemistry
      • CHE 362 Nuclear Chemistry Laboratory
      • ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 cr.)
        or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 cr.)
        or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director
      • ESG 440, 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV
        (with permission of instructor and program director)
Nanoscale Engineering
The creation of functional materials and devices which involve controllable processes and transformations at the scale of billionths of a meter promises to become a major focus of future efforts in both engineering and scientific research. By combining a thorough background in materials science, engineering design, and surface and molecular chemistry and devices, this specialization prepares students for graduate study, as well as professional positions in materials and process engineering and research and development.
  1. Two required courses:
    1. ESM 334 Materials Engineering
    2. ESG 320 Sensor Materials and Devices
  2. Three technical electives chosen from:
    • ESM 369 Polymers
    • CHE 301 Physical Chemistry I
    • CHE 302 Physical Chemistry II
    • CHE 321 Organic Chemistry I
    • CHE 322 Organic Chemistry II
    • CHE 345 Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry
    • BME 381 Nanofabrication in Biomedical Applications
    • ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice (3 cr.)
      or ESM 499 Research in Materials Science (3-4 cr.)
      or other departmental independent research with permission of the program director
    • ESG 440, 441 Engineering Science Design III, IV
      (with permission of instructor and program director)



1. [Effective Spring 2004]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in English or refer to pages 183-184 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

EGL 381 and 382 have been added to Note 3 below:

Requirements for the Major in English
    A. Study within the Area of the Major
    Notes on Section A:
        3. Among the six 300-level courses from among courses numbered 300-399, only one may be used from EGL 381, 382, 385, 386, 387.
2. [Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in English or refer to page 183 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Requirements 2 and 4 for the Major have been modified as follows:

Requirements for the Major in English
    A. Study within the Area of the Major

    2. One course in the study of the English language:
    • EGL 380 The English Language
    • EGL 300-G Old English
    • LIN 101 Introduction to General Linguistics

    4. Seven 300-level courses from among courses numbered EGL 300-399; EGL 490 and 496 may also be used.

Environmental Studies (ENS)

[Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in Environmental Studies or refer to pages 186- 188 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Under Requirements for the Major, A. Foundation Courses, 1. Natural Sciences Courses, BIO 201 Principles of Biology From Organisms to Ecosystems has been deleted and replaced by "BIO 113 General Ecology or BIO 150 The Living World".

Under B. Core Courses:
1. BIO 113 has been deleted and replaced by "BIO 201 Fundamentals of Biology: Organisms to Ecosystems".



Federated Learning Community Minor in Globalization (GLS)

[Effective Fall 2003]
For reference, please see the FLC Minor in Globalization.

The Federated Learning Community is a one to two year program that focuses on an issue of major importance and leads to an academic minor. The program design enables students to register for a cluster of courses arranged around that issue. The program seminars focus and integrate the material of the "federated" courses in a small community setting. The topic for 2003-2004 continues as Globalization. The program responds to the growing globalization of the economy, the interdependence of nations and peoples, and the growth of international political institutions. It provides an interdisciplinary approach that includes the study of Western and non-Western cultures, requires an understanding of comparative socio-cultural analysis, is concerned with global links, interactions, and synergies, and considers how global changes can be assessed and changed to improve the quality of life of current and future generations and provide resources for a sustainable future.

All students may enroll in federated courses but to receive the minor in Globalization, students must complete 24 credits of federated courses, including the program seminars, FLC 301 and FLC 302, and six additional courses from a list of approved courses. Courses offered for Fall 2003 that may be applied toward the minor include:

    EGL 395-G War Poets
    EST 201-H Technological Trends In Society
    EST/POL 412 Intelligence Organization, Technology, and Democracy
    HUE 269-I Film, War, Memory
    PHI 367 Philosophy of War and Peace
    POL 372-J Politics of the Third World
    SOC 348-F Global Sociology
    SOC/POL 374 Global Issues in the U.N
    WST 395-J Topics in Global Feminism
All courses offered for the minor must be completed with a letter grade of C or higher.

For more information about the Federated Learning Community minor in Global Studies, contact Prof. Hermann Kurthen at hkurthen@notes.cc.sunysb.edu or call or stop by the Learning Communities Program office, Library N-3007 or call (631) 632-4378.

Geology (GEO)

[Effective Fall 2003]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in Geology or refer to pages 194-95 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

Under "Required Departmental Courses, Geology Track", replace GEO 305 Field Geology with GEO 405 Field Camp. GEO 405 is required for the geology track of the major.

In the "Sample Course Sequence" (printed Bulletin only), Geology Track, spring semester junior year, replace GEO 305 with an elective. GEO 405 should be taken during the summer between junior and senior years.


German (GER)

[Effective Fall 2003]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in German or refer to page 198 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

The Interdisciplinary Minor in German for Business is no longer offered.


Health Science (HAN)

[Effective Fall 2003]
For reference, please see the Major in Health Science or refer to page 199 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

The former concentration in Radiation Therapy/Medical Dosimetry (which previously required HAN 392, 480, 482, 484, 486, 488, and 492) has been divided into two distinct concentrations. See 6. Radiation Therapy and 7. Medical Dosimetry below for new information.
    6. Radiation Therapy
    This concentration is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a Radiation Therapy Aide. Upon completion of this concentration students can apply to the12-month, hospital based post-baccalaureate Radiation Therapy program, which prepares students for entry-level clinical radiation therapy positions. Radiation Therapy is the use of radiation to treat or relieve pain from cancer and other diseases.

      1. HAN 480 Introduction to Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry
      2. HAN 482 Introduction to Pathology
      3. HAN 484 Radiation Therapy Physics
      4. HAN 486 Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy
      5. HAN 488 Medical Imaging and Radiographic Anatomy

    For admission to the 12-month, hospital based post-baccalaureate Radiation Therapy program, preference will be given to students who:
    • document a strong science and mathematics background (minimum grade of "C" in each course*; overall G.P.A. of 2.5) from high school and/or college
    • have CPR certification
    • have health care experience (paid or volunteer) and/or community service

    *Coursework includes: algebra, advanced algebra, geometry, trigonometry, natural science, general physics, human anatomy, physiology

    7. Medical Dosimetry
    This concentration* is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to be a Radiation Therapy Aide. Upon completion of this concentration, students may apply for admission to the 12-month, hospital based post-baccalaureate Medical Dosimetry program, which prepares students for entry-level medical dosimetry positions. A Medical Dosimetrist is a member of the Radiation Oncology team who has the education and expertise necessary to generate radiation dose distributions and dose calculations in collaboration with the medical physicist and the radiation oncologist for cancer patients.

      1. HAN 480 Introduction to Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry
      2. HAN 482 Introduction to Pathology
      3. HAN 486 Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy
      4. HAN 488 Medical Imaging and Radiographic Anatomy
      5. HAN 492 Radiation Oncology Medical Physics II

    For admission to the 12-month, hospital based post-baccalaureate Medical Dosimetry program, preference will be given to students who:
    • have had two semesters of college calculus and physics with a grade "C" or better (or the equivalent in AP college credits)
    • have completed courses in geometry, trigonometry and intermediate algebra with a grade "C" or better
    • have earned an overall G.P.A. of 2.5 in college-level course work
    • Anatomy and physiology are strongly recommended

    *HAN 392 Radiation Oncology Medical Physics I (4 credits) is required as a prerequisite for the Medical Dosimetry concentration.

Materials Science (ESM)
[Effective Fall 2003]
For reference, please see the Minor in Materials Science or refer to page 227 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

For students in the engineering science major, the requirements have been revised as follows:

Five courses are required:
    1. Four courses chosen from
      ESM 302 Introduction to the Crystalline State
      ESM 309 Thermodynamics of Solids
      ESM 325 Diffraction Techniques and Structure of Solids
      ESM 334 Materials Engineering
      ESM 353 Biomaterials: Manufacture, Properties, and Applications
      ESM 369 Polymers
      CHE 301 Physical Chemistry I
      CHE 302 Physical Chemistry II
      CHE 351 Quantum Chemistry

    2. One of the following:
      ESG 487 Cooperative Research in Technological Solutions
      ESM 475 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum
      ESM 488 Cooperative Industrial Practice
      ESM 499 Research in Materials Science
No more than two non-ESM courses may count toward the minor. ESG core courses cannot be used to meet requirements for both the ESG major and the ESM minor.


Mechanical Engineering
[Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major and Minor in Mechanical Engineering (MEC) or refer to pages 233-236 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

There have been extensive changes to the Major and Minor in Mechanical Engineering. Please click on the link above to see the rewritten text and requirements.


Pharmacology

[Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Major in Health Science or refer to page 248 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

The Organic Chemistry sequence has been modified. CHE 321, Organic Chemistry I, remains the same, while Organic Chemistry II has been split into two levels: CHE 322, Organic Chemsitry IIA, and CHE 326, Organic Chemistry IIB. CHE 326 is designed especially for those who may major in chemistry, biochemistry, or another physical science, and may not be taken for credit in addition to CHE 322. In addition, CHE 331, 332, Honors Organic Chemistry, have been discontinued.

Please revise as follows:

Requirements for the Major in Pharmacology (BCP)
A. Courses in Related Fields
3. The Organic Chemistry sequence has been revised as follows:
CHE 321, 326 Organic Chemistry I, IIB

Living/Learning Center Interdisciplinary Minor:
Science and Engineering (LSE)
[Effective Fall 2004]
For reference, please see the Living/Learning Center Interdisciplinary Minor in Science and Engineering or refer to page 275 of the printed 2003-2005 Undergraduate Bulletin.

The minor has been restructured, and is rewritten as follows:

Because scientists and engineers increasingly work together in industry, government, and higher education, Stony Brook offers an interdisciplinary minor in science and engineering. The interdisciplinary minor in science and engineering is designed to give students an appreciation of the many fields in science and engineering and of the relationships of these fields to each other and to society. Through the minor, students receive broad exposure to several science and engineering disciplines represented at Stony Brook. This minor will also provide students with opportunities to study issues that scientists and engineers face today and to learn about future trends and research that will change the face of science and engineering in the 21st century. Technical writing and oral presentation skills are an integral part of the upper-level courses in the minor.

The minor is intended primarily, but not exclusively, for residents of the O'Neill College Science and Engineering Living Learning Center.

Requirements for the Minor in Science and Engineering (LSE)

Before declaring the Science and Engineering minor, each student should plan his or her program in consultation with the minor coordinator. All courses for the minor must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.

Completion of the minor requires 19-22 credits. (See note 1.)
    1. All of the following minor courses:
        • LSE 201 Opportunities in Science and Engineering
        • LSE 310 Current issues in Science and Engineering
        • LSE 320 Future Trends in Science and Engineering
    2. Two introductory science courses from the list of department designators below. Courses must not be from the same department. (See notes 2 and 4.)
        • Astronomy (AST)
        • Atmospheric Sciences (ATM)
        • Biology (BIO)
        • Chemistry (CHE)
        • Geosciences (GEO)
        • Marine Sciences (MAR)
        • Physics (PHY)
    3. One introductory engineering or applied science course from the list of department designators below. (See notes 3 and 4.)
        • Biomedical Engineering (BME)
        • Chemical and Molecular Engineering (CME)
        • Computer Science and Information Systems (CSE/ISE)
        • Electrical and Computer Engineering (ESE)
        • Engineering Science (ESG)
        • Materials Science (ESM)
        • Mechanical Engineering (MEC)
    4. One course in technology and society from the following:
        • EST 302 Assessment of Computer-Based Technologies
        • EST 320 Communication Technology Systems
        • EST 330 Natural Disasters: Societal Impacts and Technological Solutions
        • EST 391 Technology Assessment
Notes:
    1. Some courses in science, engineering, and applied science require pre-calculus or one semester of calculus or a specific math placement level. Please review course prerequisites carefully or consult with the minor advisor before registration.
    2. Students majoring in AST, ATM, BIO, CHE, GEO, or PHY may not use courses in their own major department to fulfill requirement 2.
    3. Students majoring in BME, CME, CSE, ESE, ESG, ISE, or MEC may not use courses in their own major department to fulfill requirement 3.
    4. A list of acceptable courses for science and engineering is available from the minor advisor. Students who wish to register for courses in science and engineering not on the list should consult with the minor advisor for approval before registration.

Declaration of the Minor

Students must declare the interdisciplinary science and engineering minor no later than the middle of their third year, at which time they consult with the director of the minor and plan their course of study for fulfillment of the requirements. Students must be in a declared major from a specific department by the time of completion of this minor.

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary (SSI)

Pending approval by the Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee and the State Education department this fall, the interdisciplinary major in Social Sciences (SSI) will be phased out. After December 20th, 2003, the Registrar's office will no longer accept declaration of major forms that list SSI as a student's first major or second major.

Students who are declared SSI majors on or before December 19, 2003 will be able to continue their progress in the program and will continue to be awarded degrees in SSI. As of the Fall 2003 semester, they will be advised by the Multidisciplinary Studies advisor, Professor Robert Hoberman, whose office is located in the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs, Melville Library E 3310. Phone: (631) 632-7080; e-mail address: rhoberman@notes.cc.sunysb.edu.

Students who wish to pursue the Social Studies Secondary Teacher Program and who are not declared SSI majors as of December 19, 2003 must declare one of the following departmental majors: Africana Studies, Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, or Sociology. Questions regarding the Social Studies Secondary Teacher Program should be directed to Professor Lawrence Frohman. E-mail address: lfrohman@notes.cc.sunysb.edu.

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